Science

Science

Can listening to specific musical compositions reduce seizures in people with epilepsy? Can behavioral therapy reduce seizures in people with epilepsy? The answer is “yes” to both questions. To learn more, please read our article in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 

The Epicadence technology includes a medical mobile app that delivers music-based and behavioral therapies designed to reduce and prevent epileptic seizures. Results from clinical trials have demonstrated that music-based interventions with specific musical compositions, as well as epilepsy-specific behavioral therapy, can reduce seizure frequency—even in people with refractory epilepsy.

Management, Therapy, Antiseizure Music

Several clinical trials showed that auditory stimulation with specific musical compositions, such as Mozart’s K.448 and K.545 sonatas, can significantly reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures and/or epileptiform discharges in children and adults with epilepsy, including those with refractory epilepsy. Antiseizure properties of K.448 were also observed in an animal model of epilepsy. Antiepileptic mechanism of K.448 is being investigated and involves activation of parasympathetic nervous system, as well as other potential neuromodulatory mechanisms. Here is a list of clinical studies showing effects of music in people with epilepsy.


Clinical Study

Behavioral therapy for people with epilepsy resulted in significant reduction of seizures. These interventions were also effective in people with refractory epilepsy. Here is a list of clinical studies showing effects of psychobehavioral interventions in people with epilepsy.


Clinical Study

Click here to see the clinical studies in text format.